Posts Tagged ‘changes’

  • Describe and evaluate methods for measuring changes in abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem along an environmental gradient.
Ecological gradients are often found where two ecosystems meet. Biotic and abiotic factors change and form gradients in which then can be recorded. All parts of the gradient needs to be sampled, so a transect is used. The simplest one is when a line of tape is layed down across the area wanted to be measured then to take samples of all the organisms touching the tape. Many transects should be taken to obtain quantitative data. A belt transect is used for bigger samples.
  • Describe and evaluate methods for measuring changes in abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem due to a specific human activity.
Chernobyl 1986, Russia:
Nuclear reactor blew up
  • design drawback
  • human errors due to poor supervision
The cause:
This caused an increase in thermal power which lead to more explosions. This contaminated soil, plants and animals.
Respond:
  • Fire fighters tried to turn it off, it took 5000 tonnes of sand, lead and clay.
  • The UN gave £75 million to make it safe and it was fixed by an international team ten years later.
  • People had to evacuate 30km away
  • The town was cleared of everything
  • 15cm of soil depth was removed
  • land washed away and dams were built
  • wall built around it
  • food was contaminated
  • Describe and evaluate the use of environmental impact assessment (EIA).
EIA: Environmental Impact Assessment
Process for identifying the likely consequence for the biophysical environment and for man’s health and welfare of implementing particular activities and for conveying information at a stage where it can materially affect the decision, to those for sanctioning the proposals. (long definition)
Purpose of the EIA:
Helps the decision making process by providing information about the consequences of the environment. Promotes sustainable development by identifying environmentally sound practice and migration measures for development.
Used for: 
Planning process that governments set out in law when large developments are considered. They provide a documented way of examining environmental impacts that can be used as evidence in the decision making process of any new development.
What developments used in the EIA:
  • Major new road networks
  • Airport/port developments
  • Building power stations
  • Building dams and reservoirs
  • Quarrying
  • Large scale housing projects.
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  • Explain the concepts of limiting factors and carrying capacity in the context of population growth.
Carrying  capacity is the maximum number of organisms that an area or ecosystem can sustainably support over a long period of time.
There are however limiting factors including temperatures, water and nutrient availability. The main factors are temperature and water availability.
Limiting factors are factors that limit the distribution or numbers of a particular population. Limiting factors are environmental factors which slow down population growth.
Temperature:
There are many ways the temperature can affect species. For example some seeds only grow in extremely high temperatures as it enriches the soil with nutrients and kills competition. However some are damaged if they are too warm or too cold. Some are able to survive low temperature. Animals adapt to the hot/ cold temperature either by burrowing under the ground to avoid heat or having cold blood in the heat.
Water:
All plants/animals need water to survive, for plants have no water could cause the plant to not germinate or seeds to die. No water = Death.
  • Describe and explain S and J populations curves.
S-curve (Sigmoidal) : population growth curve that shows a rapid growth at the beginning then a slow down as the carrying capacity is reached.
J-curve:
A population curve which shows only exponential growth. It starts slow the becomes increasingly fast.
  • Describe the role of density-dependent and density-independent factors, and internal and external factors, in the regulation of populations.
Density-dependent factors:
Factors that lower the birth rate or raise the death rate as a population grows in size. They are negative feedback mechanisms leading to the stability or regulation of the population.
When prey increases so does the predator, but when this occurs the prey decreases and then again the predators decrease too causing the prey to increase again.
Density-independent factors:
Factors that affect a population irrespective of population density notably environmental change. Abiotic factors are density-independent factors, the most important ones are the extremes of weather (droughts, fires and hurricane) and long-term climate change.
These factors have an impact that can increase the death rate and reduce the birth rate, it all depends on how severe the event was.
Factors which regulate population size can be divided into either INTERNAL or EXTERNAL.
Internal:  fertility rates, territory sizes
External: predation, pressure, parasitism
The major cause of population regulation are in the environments, these can be physical or biological.
The physical class of environmental factors are water availability, nutrient availability anf so on.
Biological factors include predators, and competition.
Ways humans can cause population growth:
  • increase available resources
  • reduce competition
  • reduce pressure from predators
  • introduce animals to new areas
Ways to decline population:
  • change environment, cause habitat disruption
  • change the biological environment by introducing new species
  • cause secondary extinctions
  • overkill
  • Describe the principles associated with survivorship curves including, K and r strategists.
Survivorship curves and r and k strategists:
K-strategists are slow growing and produce few, large offspring that mature slowly.
R-strategists, slow and mature quickly and produce many, small offspring.
K= carrying capacity
R= growth rate
K-strategist:
  • low reproductivity
  • large investment in parental care
  • late maturity/longer living
  • slow growth
  • larger size
  • require stable environment
R-straegists:
  • high reproductivity
  • short life
  • low investment in parental care
  • early maturity
  • rapid growth
  • small organisms
  • highly adaptable
  • large number of few species
Survivorship rates:
What influences survivorship rates:
  • competition for resources
  • adverse environmental conditions
  • predator-prey relationships
Example of survivorship curve:
  • curve for species where individuals survive for their potential life span, and die at the same time. Salmons/humans (K-strategists)
  • curve for species where individuals die young but who survives lives very long life turtles/ oysters. (r-strategists)
  • Describe the concept and processes of succession in a named habitat.
Succession: Change in the community structure of a particular area over time.
Primary succession: colonization of newly created land by organisms (rock).
Secondary succession: occurs in places where a previous community has been destroyed. (forest/fire) It is faster than primary succession because of the presence of soil and a seed bank.
Pioneer= earliest community of the succession.
Climax community= the last and final community.
The change from pioneer to climax is called a sere.
Succession is the process of change over time in a community changes in the community of organisms frequently cause changes in the physical environment that allow another community to become established and replace the former through competition. They get more complex at the end.
Zonation:
The arrangement or patterning of plant communities or ecosystems into bands in response to change, over a distance, in some environmental factor.
The main biomes display zonation with altitude on a mountain, or around the edge of a pond in relation to soil moisture.
  • Explain the changes in energy flow, gross and net productivity, diversity and mineral cycling in different stage of succession. 
GP, NP and diversity will change over time as a ecosystem goes through succession. GP is low in early stages then increases as soils become more structured. As food webs become more structured NPP and diversity stabilize as the ecosystem reach climax population.
  • Describe factors affecting the nature of climax communities. 
Climax community:
  • greater biomass
  • higher levels of species diversity
  • more favourable soil condition
  • better soil structure
  • lower pH
  • taller and longer living plant species
  • more k-strategies or fewer r-strategist
  • greater habitat diversity
  • steady state equilibrium
Climate and edaphic factors determine the nature of a climax community. Human factors frequently affect this process through, for example; fire, agricultures, grazing and/or habitat destruction.