Posts Tagged ‘factors’

  • List the significant abiotic (physical) factors of an ecosystem.

Ecosystems can be divided into 3 types:

  • Marine: the sea, salt marshes mangroves are all characterized by the salt content.
  • Freshwater: rivers, lakes and wetlands.
  • Terrestrial: land-based.

Each ecosystem has its on abiotic factors:

Marine:

  • salinity
  • pH
  • temperature
  • dissolved oxygen
  • wave action

Freshwater:

  • turbidity
  • flow velocity
  • pH
  • temperature
  • dissolved oxygen

Terrestrial:

  • temperature
  • light intensity
  • particle size
  • slope/aspect
  • soil moisture
  • drainage
  • mineral content
  • Describe  and evaluate methods  for measuring at least three abiotic (physical) factors within an ecosystem.

Abiotic factors that can be measured within an ecosystem include the following:

Marine:

  • salinity: this can be measured  using electrical conductivity ( with a datalogger) or by the density of the water (water with high salt content is more denser than low-salt water).
  • pH: this can be measured using a pH meter, or datalogging pH probe. Indicator solution may also be used.
  • temperature: ordinary thermometers are too fragile to use for fieldwork, and are hard to read. An electric thermometer allows temperature to be measured  in depth.
  • dissolved oxygen: a meter with oxygen-sensitive electrodes connected that measures dissolved oxygen. One should be careful as doing things wrong may contaminate the air.
  • wave action: this is measured by using a dynomometer which measures the force in waves.

Freshwater:

  • turbidity: can be measured using a Secchi disc, nephlometer or turbidimeter.
  • flow velocity: can be measured by timing how long it takes a floating object to travel a certain distance or by using a flow-meter.
  • temperature: ordinary thermometers are too fragile to use for fieldwork, and are hard to read. An electric thermometer allows temperature to be measured  in depth.
  • dissolved oxygen: a meter with oxygen-sensitive electrodes connected that measures dissolved oxygen. One should be careful as doing things wrong may contaminate the air.

Terrestrial:

  • temperature: ordinary thermometers are too fragile to use for fieldwork, and are hard to read. An electric thermometer allows temperature to be measured  in depth.
  • light intensity: is measured using a light-meter.
  • wind speed: a Beufort-scale is used to measure wind speed and precise measurements can be made with a digital anemometer.
  • particle size: this determines the drainage and water-holding capacity and is measured by using a series of sieves.
  • slope: this is measured using a clinometer and using a compass.
  • soil moisture: by weighing the samples then heating them it shows the amount of water that has evaporated and the moisture levels.
  • mineral content: the loss on the ignition test can determine mineral content. The samples are heated for several hours to let volatile substances to escape.
Abiotic data can be collected using instruments that avoid issues of objectivity as they directly measure quantitative data. Instruments allow us to record data that would otherwise be beyond the limit of our perception.